What’s The Best Neuropathy Treatment?

Start With An Accurate Diagnosis…

Neuropathy Diagnosis First Steps

Could my neuropathy symptoms be due to something else? This is a question I get all the time. I wish it were easy to answer.

But it’s not. That is unless of course you are sure you actually have neuropathy!

Some neuropathy treatments when probably applied can be a godsend. They help many patients’ recover, sleep better function better improve mobility strength and even endurance.

Others have no merit at all.

Most drugs only mask symptoms and do little or nothing to improve nerve function.

But one of the problems we are seeing more and more is when patients self diagnose, or are wrongly diagnosed, and then apply treatments which are ineffective.

There are for example some things, which can masquerade as peripheral neuropathy. One of the most common is disc disease of the spine. When spinal disks herniate, or bulge centrally they can irritate your spinal cord and adjacent nerve roots creating symptoms, which mimic those due to other conditions such as diabetes.

Another common condition is spinal stenosis, even when the stenosis (which simply means narrowing) occurs in the neck or cervical spine.

A couple other conditions, which can masquerade as peripheral neuropathy, include RSD, MS or multiple sclerosis, and rarely infections involving the spine or nervous system.

This is why is very important to get an accurate diagnosis FIRST wherever possible. Make sure your clinician has ruled out all possibilities.

Help your neuropathy treatment clinician by revealing all trauma, surgeries, and even medication exposures, even if you think they are not significant.

By doing this, you will be paving the way for more effective neuropathy treatment.

As I tell new clinicians we train on a regular basis, working with peripheral neuropathy patients requires extreme diligence. Often times we find patients have more than one condition existing at the same time.

Unless your neuropathy treatment clinician is a trained NeuropathyDR Specialist they may overlook or miss these things that maybe related your symptoms.

So why not save yourself lots of time money and aggravation and consult with one of our clinicians vis Telemedicine or in person, today?

Just Go HERE:

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“Failed Back Surgery Syndrome”

The minute you injured you back, your life changed forever…

The constant pain…

The loss of mobility…

The inability to live a normal life.

You wanted so desperately to feel normal again you agreed to back surgery.

And your pain is worse than ever.

If you’ve undergone back surgery and you’re still suffering from

Dull, aching pain in your back and/or legs

Abnormal sensitivity including sharp, pricking, and stabbing pain in your arms or legs

Peripheral neuropathy and the symptoms that go with it – numbness, tingling, loss of sensation or even burning in your arms and legs

You could have “Failed Back Surgery Syndrome” or “FBSS”.

You’re not alone.  Back surgeries fail so often now they actually have a name for the condition patients develop when it happens.  As back pain experts, NeuropathyDR® clinicians see patients like you almost every day.

What Exactly Is “Failed Back Surgery Syndrome”?

Failed Back Surgery Syndrome[1] is what the medical community calls the chronic pain in the back and/or legs that happens after a patient undergoes back surgery.

Several things can contribute to the development of Failed Back Surgery Syndrome.  It can be caused by a herniated disc not corrected by the surgery, swelling or a “mechanical” neuropathy that causes pressure on the spinal nerves, a change in the way your joints move, even depression or anxiety.

If you smoke, have diabetes or any autoimmune or vascular disease, you have a much higher chance of developing Failed Back Surgery Syndrome.

If you do have any of these conditions, think long and hard before you agree to back surgery.

Non-Surgical Treatments for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

You know you don’t want another surgery and who could blame you? You’ve already been through the pain of surgery and recovery only to be in worse shape than you were before the surgery.

The good news is that there are some excellent alternatives to surgery.  One of the best places to start is with your local NeuropathyDr® specialist.

NeuropathyDR® clinicians have a treatment protocol is often perfect for treating Failed Back Surgery Syndrome.

Hallmarks of for the chronic back pain associated with Failed Back Surgery Syndrome are:

Therapeutic massage to manipulate the soft tissues of the body to relax the muscles and eliminate “knots” in the muscles that can cause or contribute to your back pain and other symptoms.

Manual therapy to restore motion to the vertebrae, alleviate pressure and get your spine and muscular system back into proper alignment.

Yoga and other low impact exercises to aid in relaxation, pain management and alleviating stress and depression.

Proper nutrition to help your body heal itself.  This is especially important if you have diabetes or some other underlying illness that could be contributing to your peripheral neuropathy.

All of these are components of the NeuropathyDR® treatment protocol.

The right combination of these treatment approaches in the hands of a knowledgeable health care provider, well versed in the treating Failed Back Surgery Syndrome, can be an excellent alternative to yet another surgery.

If you’re tired of living with the pain and don’t want to go under the knife again, contact your local NeuropathyDR® specialist to see if their exclusive protocol for treating chronic back pain, peripheral neuropathy and Failed Back Surgery Syndrome will work for you.

You’ll leave us wishing you had made the call sooner.

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Neuropathy and the Dairy Connection

Here’s What You Need to Know About How Dairy Impacts Your Health.

A lot of people in the American food industry simply don’t want you to know about the real impact of diary on your health, especially for people with diabetic neuropathy.

But there’s more and more scientific evidence than adult humans just weren’t meant to consume milk, and when they do, negative health impacts can happen. The most common issue is the number of adult digestive and allergy disturbances that disappear when dairy is stopped.

And there are other, more serious issues including possible inflammatory and cancer connections.

And what we see in our offices is that eradicating gluten and dairy from your diet may lead to significant relief from inflammation and pain related to diabetic neuropathy.

We always recommend gradual shifts in dietary choices. It’s okay to replace milk with similar products like coconut milk, rice milk, or almond milk. Many people find that soy milk has a distinctive flavor that may not make it everyone’s favorite milk alternative. No matter, what, try to avoid products with added sugar and thickeners or preservatives. Carrageenan is one that is known to be detrimental to the digestive tract.

There are also alternatives to cheese, mainstream yogurt, and other products made from cows milk. We highly recommend doing the research on your own in order to tailor your dietary changes to your own life. This will give you a greater sense of control over your own health and wellness. Be sure to share with your doctor what you are doing and plan to do.

Remember, too, that no one “magic bullet” is going to be the one to reduce 100% of your diabetic neuropathy problems. Instead, look at a dietary shift as one of several gradual changes for better wellness, including exercise, at-home neurostimulation protocols recommended by your doctor, and any medications he or she feels is needed at least at first to get your diabetic neuropathy symptoms under control.
Looking for a NeuropathyDR® expert near you? Click here.

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Peripheral Neuropathy Caused by Immune Malfunction or CIDP

A Chronic Immune Disorder Like CIDP Can Cause a Range of Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms.

Immune disorders, in which your body’s own systems begin to attack good cells as if they were invaders, can cause weak nerve responses and peripheral neuropathy issues.

These nerve problems can range from:

  • Tingling or numbness in hands or feet
  • Pain in extremities
  • Lost reflexes and weak muscle response
  • Unrelenting sense of tiredness
  • Fainting
  • Trouble with mobility

These peripheral neuropathy symptoms are a clue that you may be experiencing a specific type of immune disease known as CIDP, short for “chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.” It’s an acquired disorder that shares many features with Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

In short, the immune system malfunctions, attacking the nervous system, which causes damage to the myelin sheath—a protective covering that is supposed to shield nerves from harm.

With CIDP, peripheral neuropathy symptoms can progress very rapidly, and yet you may also have good days. If you happen to see your doctor on a good day, you may not get an accurate diagnosis. Over time, the bad days can include issues with bladder and bowel control, walking, and other major functions. Be sure to track your symptoms and share this detailed list with your doctor to add in a correct diagnosis. He or she will want to see evidence of at least 8 weeks’ worth of symptoms for a CIDP diagnosis.

Your doctor should also do several tests to help narrow the diagnosis, possibly including a nerve conductor series, blood tests to rule out different autoimmune disorders, and in some cases a nerve biopsy.

CIDP isn’t currently curable, but your peripheral neuropathy symptoms can be treated and managed well. New medical treatments though are getting better every year!

There are also many steps you can take at home to help repair your immune system and support healing. Through dietary choices, exercise, and home treatment protocols like our NDGen Neurostimulator, you can take charge of your wellness.

A great place to start is our neuropathy owners manual, I Beat Neuropathy!

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Neuropathy Basics: Distinguishing Sensory Neuropathy from Motor Neuropathy

What You Need to Know about the Two Types of Neuropathy and How to Treat Them

Why is neuropathy so difficult sometimes to diagnose and treat?

Well, for starters, there is no one disorder known as neuropathy. Technically, it’s an entire group of issues ranging from basic to complex.

One helpful way of subdividing this class of disorders is to think about sensory vs. motor. Sensory neuropathy is about sensation or lack of sensation—in other words, tingling or pain on one end of the spectrum and numbness on the other end.

Losing sensation can also affect balance, which is a major quality of life issue.

Things like diabetic neuropathy (in its early stages), neuropathy related to metabolic syndrome, and chemotherapy induced neuropathy are examples of sensory neuropathies.

On the other hand, motor (or movement) neuropathy describes a loss of power and strength in the muscles. The major symptom of this type of neuropathy is muscle weakness.

Unfortunately, motor issues can be difficult to diagnose and even harder to treat. You can end up with motor neuropathy as a side effect of a Lyme disease infection, or it can be genetic.

What’s important to know about sensory vs. motor neuropathy is that even the most advanced cases with the worst symptoms can often show some amount of improvement through self care. That means good nutrition, physical therapy, and at-home neurostimulation techniques. Some types of supplements may also help, such as CoQ10.

Even though I’m urging self care, I want to make sure you truly understand that a good self care protocol and treatment plan is always developed in collaboration with a knowledgeable neuropathy clinician.

If you don’t know where to turn to find a trained neuropathy expert in your local area, click here for a list of NeuropathyDR® clinicians sorted by region.

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Neuropathy Treatment: The True First Step

In neuropathy treatment, the first step to getting good care is probably not what you think.

The real first step in obtaining effective neuropathy treatment may surprise you.

It isn’t finding a good clinician who is well trained in neuropathy treatment options, although that’s vital for your well being right now and over time.

It isn’t making lifestyle changes in exercise, diet, and self care, although these kinds of shifts can have significant positive impacts on your health after a neuropathy diagnosis.

Truly, the first step to neuropathy treatment that works is to adjust your mindset.

To thrive despite a neuropathy diagnosis, you must be willing to see yourself as the primary expert on your own health and the most important part of your medical team.

That’s because a passive approach, in which you simply do what doctors tell you and accept whatever teaching they may provide, is the worst possible attitude for a patient undergoing neuropathy treatment.

The most successful neuropathy patients are the ones who are able to:

  • Identify their own specific neuropathy issues and needs.
  • Implement changes at home that support neuropathy treatment in the doctor’s office.
  • Ask questions about the neuropathy treatment plan of care.
  • Advocate for themselves when doctors are not meeting their needs.

For your neuropathy treatment to be most effective, it is essential for you to take action. Sometimes the first action that is needed is to ask a question. Sometimes it’s doing research to find out about alternative and complementary medicine that can help you. Sometimes it’s making a needed change in your daily routine, whether that’s giving up smoking or transitioning to a healthy neuropathy diet with vital nutrients.

Your journey to effective neuropathy treatment begins with a single step: identifying the next thing that needs to be done.

What’s your essential next step? If you’re not sure, take a look at our Neuropathy owners manual, I Beat Neuropathy!

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Neuropathy Patients Must Be Powerful Self Advocates

As a neuropathy patient, you need to be the most powerful member of your medical team. Here’s how to do it.

Your neuropathy treatment team is well trained and highly educated. But they are not the true experts on your neuropathy.

The only real expert on YOUR neuropathy is you.

You’re the one who is there 24/7 experiencing neuropathic pain and physical limitations. You live in your body, and you know what’s normal for you.

The only way to get effective neuropathy care is to be a powerful self advocate. You are the most important member of your treatment team. They simply can’t get the job done without your vital input!

What does this mean?

Here is how you can advocate for yourself in your neuropathy treatment.

  1. Provide detailed, up to date information about your symptoms. Keep a daily log so that you can track frequency and severity. Be honest and don’t leave anything out.
  2. Tell your doctor about all medications and supplements you are taking, including vitamins and herbs, as well as over the counter medications such as ibuprofen or allergy medications.
  3. Be honest about your history and current use of alcohol, tobacco products, caffeine, and other drugs that can affect your symptoms and interact with prescription medications.
  4. Read what is out there about neuropathy treatment. Ask questions about whether the techniques you’ve read about are appropriate for your care.
  5. Share your worries and concerns. If the doctor seems to brush them off, state them again and make sure he or she understands what you mean. Ask WHY that particular symptom or occurrence is not significant in your doctor’s eyes.
  6. Write down everything that your doctor says during the visit. If that is difficult for you, bring a tape recorder or a family member / friend who can take notes.
  7. If you still have unanswered questions at the end of your visit, ask the doctor for more time or request another professional (such as a nurse practitioner) to come in and talk more with you.

If you feel that your current medical team is not addressing your needs, look for a doctor in your area who has specific training in neuropathy issues. Click here for a list of NeuropathyDR™ specialists.

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Just Diagnosed? The Next Step After Your Neuropathy Diagnosis

A Neuropathy Diagnosis Can Be Frightening and Confusing. Here’s What To Do Next.

Finding out about your neuropathy diagnosis can be a confusing and even frightening time. You may be feeling overwhelmed with information and choices. Or you may be uncertain whether you are correctly understanding what your doctor has said.

Often, newly diagnosed neuropathy patients have been living with increasingly painful symptoms for a while. It may be stunning to discover that nerve damage is responsible for those symptoms.

You may also be adjusting to the diagnosis or treatment of a systemic condition that has led to neuropathy symptoms, such as lupus, cancer, or diabetes.

It’s a lot to get used to, and it may be hard to know what you should do next.

Let me share some of the most basic steps that should happen right after a neuropathy diagnosis.

The immediate step is to address any acute symptom flare-ups that may be happening. That may mean being hospitalized to get control of an episode related to an autoimmune disease or diabetic crisis. Or it may mean seeking appropriate medication to reduce inflammation or pain.

When this immediate crisis has settled, the next step for you is to address your daily health habits that can positively or negative affect the long-term outcome of your neuropathy diagnosis. If you are more than 20 pounds overweight, work with your doctor on a plan to drop those extra pounds in a safe way. Reduce or remove sugar and processed foods from your diet. Stop smoking as quickly as possible.

You can also take other steps such as filtering the water in your home, using only “green” cleaning agents, and building moderate exercise into your daily routine.

Perhaps the most important step is to identify a trained neuropathy doctor in your area who can provide the most up-to-date and comprehensive treatment plan for your neuropathy diagnosis. Click here to find a NeuropathyDR® specialist near you.

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Diabetic Neuropathy and Good Chiropractic Care

In Diabetic Neuropathy, Chiropractic Care Can Reduce Symptoms and Improve Quality of Life.

Some kinds of neuropathy happen to people with diabetes, a severe imbalance in blood sugar levels which can block proper blood flow to the nerves.

With diabetes, you might also have some of these diabetic neuropathy symptoms:

  • Loss of ability to feel warm or cold sensations
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Problems controlling your bladder
  • Digestive trouble, like vomiting or nausea and diarrhea
  • Feelings of burning, tingling, or numbness in your feet or hands
  • General muscle weakness

Some of these symptoms, specifically numbness in the hands and feet, can lead to some of the most dangerous complications of diabetes: infection, slow healing, and the possible need amputation as a lifesaving measure.

With this diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy, you may already have been directed to monitor your blood sugar level, avoid certain foods in your diet, and possibly take prescription medications to manage your symptoms. You’ll also be asked to notice and report any sores, blisters, or inflamed areas that could lead to infection in order to intervene quickly to head off serious complications.

This is a great start and an important baseline of health for people with diabetic neuropathy. But for many, it isn’t enough for true symptom relief and quality of life.

In this case, consider looking into chiropractic care by a NeuropathyDR® specialist, who can address any issues you have with spinal alignment that may be negatively affecting your pancreas and other internal organs—not to mention your nervous system.

The two goals of chiropractic care in people with diabetic neuropathy are reducing your pain and beginning to help your nerves repair themselves. In addition to manually manipulating your joints and bones for proper alignment, chiropractic care may involve the use of topical pain relieving medications and various types of nerve stimulation.

If you are looking for a NeuropathyDR® specialist in your area, click here.

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Neuropathic Pain and Vitamin C

Do You Need Vitamin C Supplementation to Help Treat Your Neuropathic Pain?

Vitamin C is most famous for its role in reducing the time it takes to recover from a cold or other infections. This key nutrient boosts the immune system through its role in cell repair and replication of new cells.

But there’s more to it than that. Vitamin C is important for many body systems. For example, skin and ligament tissues are bound together by collagen, and vitamin C is needed in order for tissue repair to occur. This vitamin also helps the body to process toxins.

You might think of vitamin C as being a fairly innocuous substance. In fact, you might assume that more is better when it comes to vitamin C and treating neuropathic pain.

The fact is, it may not be a good idea for anyone with neuropathic pain to take more than 2,000 mg daily, or to take large amounts of vitamin C in a short period of time. As with any new supplement, it’s important to talk with your doctor or medical treatment team about how to best include vitamin C in your treatment regimen.

And here’s the best news… if you are faithfully following the NeuropathyDR® diet to combat neuropathic pain, it’s highly unlikely that you would be vitamin C deficient. You’ll be eating a lot of fresh vegetables and fruits that tend to contain a high amount of vitamin C. If this is the case, you may not even need to supplement vitamin C to reach optimum levels.

Again, I have to emphasize the vital importance of combining self-care and lifestyle changes alongside any treatments recommended by your neuropathic pain medical team.

Are you treating your neuropathic pain in collaboration with a trained expert in the NeuropathyDR® method? Find an expert near you.

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