Your Best Chance of Beating a Serious Health Problem, Just Keep It Simple.

Far too often patients are chasing this doctor or that, this drug or that, in search of relief rather than getting to the bottom of what may be actually causing their #neuropathy.

586475 51841078 300x287 Your Best Chance of Beating a Serious Health Problem, Just Keep It Simple.

One of the things that is most serious but far too often ignored in cases of neuropathy, fibromyalgia, many forms of chronic pain and indeed many chronic illnesses is the impact that daily habits and of course our lifestyles have on both the prevention and progression of diseases and illnesses.

Too often, in our society there is a rush to take drugs to cover up symptoms rather than to find out what is really going on that could be perpetuating or in fact causing chronic health issues.

The most common of course in our society now is lack of fitness and excess and poor food consumption. Plain and simple, this causes more disease than any other single factor.

So you would think the smartest thing to do would be to start here when dealing with neuropathy or other health problem. Unfortunately, we find patients are conditioned far too often chasing this doctor or that, this drug or that, in search of relief rather than getting to the bottom of what may be actually causing their neuropathy.

Now this is not to say that bad things don’t happen to good people. Of course they do! This is where some of the most amazing drugs and surgery have a very wonderful place. But for the vast majority of what we see in private practice every day the solutions to so many health problems are right under our noses!

But what are you TO DO?

The first thing to understand is that “everything” doesn’t make you sick. Too often patients fall into this dismal pattern of thinking, based upon popular press and media. Nothing could be further from the truth. Everything doesn’t make you sick but many poor things in combination certainly do!

The most common of these is surrounding yourself with poor food choices, lack of regular daily fitness, and filling your home with possible environmental toxins. If this is the case, then the solution is obvious!

That’s why we do what we do here at Beating Neuropathy! Stick with us every day and we will help as much as we can!

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Your Best Chance of Beating a Serious Health Problem, Just Keep It Simple. is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Neuropathy? Why did I get it?

In fact, neuropathy is a group of disorders.

neurodrProfessionals webready 300x86 Neuropathy? Why did I get it?

A question we get all the time is, why did I get neuropathy?

If you read advertisements in the popular press then you would likely believe neuropathy is one condition. As we have discussed many times before and will discuss again today, nothing could be further from the truth. In fact neuropathy is actually a group of disorders.

Neuropathy is the term that simply refers to nerve function gone wrong. Of course this is a gross oversimplification but I’m sure you get the picture.

The known causes of neuropathy include diabetes, certain medications; including some chemotherapy, poisonings from things such as heavy metals and some insecticides.

There are also some devastating forms of neuropathy that are genetic. Most commonly this is the CMT family of neuropathies.

But perhaps the most common cause of neuropathy and the reason for many more cases of neuropathy now appearing each year is the general decline in fitness in our adult population resulting in metabolic syndrome or pre-diabetes.

As doctors we commonly assign half the cases of neuropathy we see to metabolic syndrome. As you probably have read about here before metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, or syndrome X, are all the same condition.

In a nutshell, this serious health problem occurs either in very tiny time increments or over a long period of time when body fat increases and with it brings elevations in blood fats and blood sugars.

But the sad part is we are seeing it in younger and younger ages. Unfortunately, now we are seeing patients in their 30’s developing peripheral neuropathy!

One other factor that is imperative to note: Most patients we see in the clinic have several different potential causes of peripheral neuropathy. For one example, district cigarette smoking. Example two is the consumption of statin or anti-hypertensive drugs. And three, excess body fat and decrease in lean muscle mass as a result of years of poor health habits.

And here is the answer to the title question:

You may never know completely with 100% accuracy what caused your neuropathy.

However, you now know about some of the critical factors that need to be addressed in order to boost your potential for healing and recovery.

Here at NeuropathyDR this our ongoing job for you!

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Neuropathy? Why did I get it? is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Boron, Vanadium and Other Ultra Trace Elements.

This could possibly be the connection between vanadium #neuropathy #diabetes #fibromyalgia and other forms of chronic pain.

Fotolia 41734006 S 300x200 Boron, Vanadium and Other Ultra Trace Elements.

Last time, we spoke about the role of trace elements in health and nutrition.

By definition, trace elements are those necessary for life and growth however, only in the tiniest amounts.

Vanadium and Boron are two more ultra trace elements we should talk about.

In some studies the element Boron has been found to help reduce the loss of calcium in our bodies. Therefore, it may actually have a positive and protective role in bone density maintenance.

In most situations, boron is relatively nontoxic in the forms most consumed by people. Boric acid for example has long been used as a preparation in health care with very rare adverse incidents.

Vanadium, another ultra trace element seems to have a role in potentiating the activities of insulin and blood sugar control. This of course could possibly be the connection between vanadium, neuropathy, diabetes, fibromyalgia and other forms of chronic pain.

I will caution you however, never to self-treat with vanadium supplements alone. To do so could be very dangerous!

Like everything, however you will find individual supplements and claims made for so many individual nutrients. Boron and vanadium are no exception. Be very careful here.

If you consume a diet that is high in vegetables, seeds nuts and the lean proteins, a deficiency of trace elements is extremely rare. Although, not impossible, there are variations in the quality of food based upon such things as the soils in which they are grown and the regions they come from.

Also, if you are supplementing your diet as we recommend, trace elements in very tiny absorbable forms are included.

Rarely should they be prescribed alone and in our opinion, always under close medical supervision.

Because everybody is different, in rare situations deficiencies of these elements can cause significant health issues. There are different tests available.

This is another reason why it is difficult to diagnose conditions, trace element analysis by hair and urine are often very helpful.

Once again, you can see the need for working with a healthcare professional who is trained in managing your neuropathy and chronic pain. Look at all possible facets, dig deeper for answers whenever necessary.

That’s why NeuropathyDR Clinicians are here!

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Boron, Vanadium and Other Ultra Trace Elements. is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Chromium and Neuropathy-A Key Trace Element

As we wrap up our section on nutrition, I want to talk at some length about trace elements.

girl taking pil 200x300 Chromium and Neuropathy A Key Trace Element

By definition, trace elements are those essential nutrients, which are necessary for life and health but only in the tiniest amounts.

As with most nutrients, too much is not better. Neither is consuming large amounts of a single nutrient unless there is a genetic or other bona fide medical reason to do so.

So today let’s talk about the nutrient chromium. If you’ve ever seen stainless steel or shiny car parts, you probably know what chromium is. Just like copper and manganese, it is a metal. What you may not know is that most human beings in modern cultures probably get the majority of their chromium diet intake through cooking with stainless steel!

Part of this of course is because most people do not consume a diet that is naturally high in chromium.

The safest forms for human nutrition (trivalent) come from whole foods and are found in things such as broccoli (one of the highest sources) as well as coffee, potato and apple skins and nuts.

As we talk about all the time, having a large component of your diet from whole foods, which contain things like peels and skins provide some significant insurance against trace mineral deficiencies including chromium deficiency.

What you may not know however is, chromium appears to be essential for our bodies handling of blood sugar. In one particular form, that is GTF, which is short for glucose tolerance factor, this trace element may help to improve insulin (the hormone which lowers blood sugar) efficiency and potentiate insulin.

Now there is conflicting scientific evidence here, however enough research indicates that GTF is probably the safest supplement form and best included in supplementation in relatively low amounts on the order of not more than 100 µg per day.

In other words trivalent chromium helps us to process energy, particular carbohydrates and sugars from our food efficiently.

If you’ve read my other books you also understand that poor blood sugar control in the form of either diabetes or metabolic syndrome can cause peripheral neuropathy and a whole host of health disorders.

So by now the impact of chromium nutrition should be rather obvious. Without adequate amounts in our diet we are at risk for developing health risks related to blood sugar management yes and perhaps ultimately even peripheral neuropathy!

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Chromium and Neuropathy-A Key Trace Element is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Could Your Digestive Problems Be Caused by Autonomic Neuropathy?

Gastric bypass surgery has brought on a whole new subset of patients who suffer from G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy.

So…

You finally bit the bullet and had gastric bypass surgery…

Or maybe you opted for the lap band…

mail 51 Could Your Digestive Problems Be Caused by Autonomic Neuropathy?Everything went really well with the surgery and now you’re back home and on your way to your new life and brand new you.

You started to lose weight almost immediately and you couldn’t be happier with the results.

You knew you’d have some side effects[1] but you really didn’t expect anything you couldn’t handle.

But you never expected:

•      Heartburn

•      Bloating

•      Nausea and/or vomiting

•      Difficulty in swallowing because your esophagus no longer functions properly

•      Inability to empty your stomach

•      Diarrhea

•      Constipation

None of these symptoms is pleasant.  And what’s even worse is that they can last from days to weeks on end.

You knew you needed to take off the weight but it’s beginning to feel like it might not have been worth it.

They warned you about possible side effects but one they may not have mentioned could be causing one or several of your symptoms.

Your problems could be a result of Gastrointestinal or G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy.

Exactly What Does That Mean?

It means that your body is suffering from nutritional deficiencies caused by the lack of certain nutrients and vitamins.  The bypass surgery or lap band procedure may have stopped your body from taking in too much food, but it also substantially reduced the amount of nutrients and vitamins you’re getting from your food.

You no longer take in enough food with the nutrition your body needs[2].  When that happens, the body begins to break down.  One of the many issues you can develop due to what is basically malnutrition is G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy.  The nerves, specifically the Vagus Nerve is damaged by the lack of nutrition and it begins to malfunction.  That means difficulty in digesting food, difficulty in swallowing, an inability to eliminate waste properly…

Basically an inability of the digestive system to do anything it was designed to do.

Before the advent of gastric bypass surgery and lap band procedures, most people who developed G.I. Autonomic neuropathy or other types of neuropathy were diabetics, alcoholics or they live in countries where malnutrition was common.

Now gastric bypass surgery has brought on a whole new subset of patients who suffer from G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy.

The Nutrients You Probably Lack

G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy is usually caused by deficiencies in:

•           Vitamin B1 or Thiamine

•          Vitamin B3

•          Vitamin B6

•          Vitamin B12

•          Vitamin E

Many of the symptoms caused by your G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy can be lessened and possibly even controlled by a healthy diet and management of whatever underlying condition you have that could be contributing to your neuropathy.

What If You’re Not a Gastric Bypass Patient But You Have These Symptoms

What if you haven’t had gastric bypass or lap band surgery but you still have the symptoms we talked about above?  If you have

•     A history of alcohol abuse

•     Hepatitis C

•     Crohn’s Disease

•     Celiac Disease

And you’re having the problems we discussed above contact your doctor immediately.  Ask him to test to make sure that you are indeed suffering from nerve damage that could be linked to any of these causes.  Once that diagnosis has been made, ask them about treatment options.

Treatment Options

A highly skilled medical professional well versed in diagnosing and treating nerve damage is your best place to start for treatment of your G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy.  An excellent place to start is with a NeuropathyDr clinician.  They have had great success in treating patients with your symptoms using a multipronged approach that includes:

•      Care and correction for your muscular and skeletal systems

•      Treatment for any underlying medical problems

•      Nutrition education and diet planning

•      A step by step exercise regimen

•      Medication as needed or necessary

If you have a confirmed diagnosis of Gastrointestinal Autonomic Neuropathy or think you may have it, you don’t have to just live with it.  In fact, just living with it could be downright dangerous due to intestinal blockages, continued malnutrition, etc.  Contact us today for information on how G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy can be treated, your suffering lessened and exactly how to find a NeuropathyDR in your area.

Could Your Digestive Problems Be Caused by Autonomic Neuropathy? is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Peripheral Neuropathy and Your Quality of Life

There are things you can do to lessen the physical (and emotional) effects of peripheral neuropathy and help you function as normally as possible!

If you’re suffering from peripheral neuropathy, you know how much it affects your life.

Every single day…

oldercouple 300x233 Peripheral Neuropathy and Your Quality of LifeEven the simplest tasks can be difficult if not impossible…

To anyone unfamiliar with peripheral neuropathy and its symptoms, they might just think “your nerves hurt a little…”

But at a peripheral neuropathy sufferer, you know better…

Peripheral neuropathy not only affects your health, it can wreck your quality of life.

How Do You Define Quality of Life?

Generally speaking, Quality of Life is a term used to measure a person’s overall well-being. In medical terms, it usually means how well a patient has adapted to a medical condition.  It measures[1]:

  • Your physical and material well being
  • Your social relationships – how you interact with others
  • Your social activities
  • Your personal fulfillment – your career, any creative outlets you may have, how involved you are with other interests)
  • Your recreational activities – your hobbies, sports, etc.
  • Your actual health – what your health is really like and how healthy you believe you are

How do you feel about these aspects of your life?  Your attitude and approach to your illness, both your neuropathy and the underlying cause of your neuropathy (i.e., diabetes, HIV/AIDS, lupus, etc.) can make a huge difference in how well you adapt to your neuropathy symptoms.

Neuropathy Symptoms Aren’t Just Physical

The pain of peripheral neuropathy falls into the category of what is considered chronic pain.  It usually doesn’t just come and go.  You can’t just pop a couple of aspirin and forget about it.  It’s pain with its root cause in nerve damage.

The nerves that actually register pain are the actual cause of the pain.  When you’re in that kind of pain on a consistent basis, it affects you in many different ways[2]:

  • You become depressed and/or anxious
  • Your productivity and interest at work is disrupted
  • You can’t sleep
  • It’s difficult for you to get out and interact with other people so you feel isolated
  • You sometimes don’t understand why you’re not getting better

What You Can Do To Improve Your Quality of Life

You may feel like your situation is hopeless, especially if you’ve become mired in depression.

But it isn’t.

There are things you can do to lessen the physical (and emotional) effects of peripheral neuropathy and help you function as normally as possible:

  • Pay special attention to caring for your feet.  Inspect them daily for cuts, pressure spots, blisters or calluses (use a mirror to look at the bottom of your feet). The minute you notice anything out of the ordinary, call your doctor or your local NeuropathyDR® clinician for help.  Never go barefoot – anywhere.
  • Treat yourself to a good foot massage to improve your circulation and reduce pain.  Check with your insurance company – if massage is actually prescribed by your doctor, they may cover some of the cost.
  • Only wear shoes that are padded, supportive and comfortable and never wear tight socks.
  • If you smoke, quit.  Nicotine decreases circulation and if you’re a peripheral neuropathy patient, you can’t risk that.
  • Cut back on your caffeine intake.  Several studies have found that caffeine may actually make neuropathy pain worse.
  • If you sit at a desk, never cross your knees or lean on your elbows.  The pressure will only make your nerve damage worse.
  • Be really careful when using hot water.  Your peripheral neuropathy may affect the way you register changes in temperature and it’s really easy for you to burn yourself and not even realize it.
  • Use a “bed cradle” to keep your sheets away from your feet if you experience pain when trying to sleep.  That will help you rest.
  • Try to be as active as possible.  Moderate exercise is great for circulation and it can work wonders for your emotional and mental health.
  • Make your home as injury proof as possible – install bath assists and/or hand rails and never leave anything on the floor that you can trip over.
  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet.  If you don’t know what you should and shouldn’t eat, talk to your NeuropathyDR® clinician about a personalized diet plan to maintain proper weight and give your body what it needs to heal.
  • Try to get out as often as possible to socialize with others.

We hope this information helps you to better manage your peripheral neuropathy symptoms.  Take a look at the list above and see how many of these things you’re already doing to help yourself. Then talk to your local NeuropathyDR® clinician about help with adding the others to your daily life.

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Peripheral Neuropathy and Your Quality of Life is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists