Diabetes, Neuropathy and Dairy

Diabetes and neuropathy nutrition should include a dairy free diet

almonds heart shaped 300x250 Diabetes, Neuropathy and Dairy

There is a long-reported link between dairy consumption and the development of type 1 diabetes. Significant numbers of patients with type 1 diabetes can, and do, develop neuropathy.

In one of our recent articles, we spent some substantial time talking about dairy consumption, and its negative effects on human health. As I said previously, these are not popular statements—but so be it.

The fact of the matter is, the scientific evidence is overwhelming. Human beings are probably far better without dairy consumption than with it.

What you may not be aware of is there is a long-reported link between dairy consumption and the development of type 1 diabetes. You may know, significant numbers of patients with type 1 diabetes can, and do, develop neuropathy.

Also, dairy contains insulin-like growth factor which is a promoter of several different cancers, including breast and prostate cancer. Even stronger is the connection between a particular milk sugar called galactose and the development of ovarian cancer.

But more than this, 50% or more of the population has difficulty digesting milk. It is responsible for allergies, indigestion, as well as elevation in cholesterol and so-called “bad” fats.

All politics aside, let’s help the consumer understand the link between milk consumption and health. We often find that patients who do a dairy and gluten-free diet have significant reductions in both pain and inflammation.

Of course, this influences many patients with neuropathy, and, indeed, many forms of chronic pain.

The simplest way to make a dietary shift is to do so gradually. Give yourself time to explore alternatives such as almond, coconut, and rice-based products.

Like everything else, some are far better than others. Be careful of any product with added sugars. Also, many patients find thickeners such as carrageenan to be very irritating to the G.I. tract.

Of course, I encourage you to do your own research—do your homework. Unfortunately, the influence of the dairy industry is very wide. The spillover into classic nutrition, in which I was trained, is also great.

Keep in mind: in a short period of time, you could know more about dairy and human health than your doctor.

So what’s the answer? Share with them. Provide them a copy of The China Study.

Above all, remain diligent to other dietary assaults. They have a tremendous impact upon your health, well-being—and, yes, your neuropathy!

Join the conversation on Facebook!

Diabetes, Neuropathy and Dairy is a post from: #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment

The post Diabetes, Neuropathy and Dairy appeared first on #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment.

Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet

Get Started on a proper neuropathic nutrition and diet plan today!

Fotolia 41513033 XS 287x300 Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet

One main factor in many cases of peripheral neuropathy is diet. You probably know that neuropathy is linked to diabetes and other conditions where daily intake of sugars and nutrients is important, but your diet can also influence the condition of nerves in more direct ways, such as in cases where a nutritional deficiency is causing neuropathic damage.

One of the most common links between neuropathy and nutrition is a deficiency in B vitamins, particularly vitamin B-12. Fight neuropathy by eating foods like meat, fish, and eggs that are all high in B vitamins. If you are a vegetarian or vegan, don’t worry! There are many kinds of fortified cereals that contain substantial amounts of B vitamins as well (in addition to supplements, which we’ll talk about in a moment).

The Mayo Clinic recommends a diet high in fruits and vegetables for people who suffer from neuropathy. Fruits and vegetables are high in nutrients that have been shown to be effective treating neuropathy. Additionally, if you suffer from diabetes, fresh produce can mellow your blood sugar levels. If numbness or pain in your extremities is severe, keep pre-cut fruit and vegetables at the ready, so you don’t have to worry about the stress involved with preparing them! Just be careful of too much fruit sugars. This means a serving is 1/2 apple, banana, etc. Most non-starchy vegetables like greens and asparagus especially are great for most of us.

Foods that are high in Vitamin E are also good for a neuropathic diet, according to neurology.com. A deficiency of Vitamin E can happen in cases where malabsorption or malnutrition are taking place, such as the case with alcoholic neuropathy. Breakfast cereals, whole grains, vegetables and nuts are all excellent sources of vitamin E.

Lean proteins are also an important part of a healthy diet for people with neuropathy. Saturated fats and fried foods increase risk of diabetes and heart disease, in addition to aggravating nerve decay from lack of nutrients. A variety of foods—skinless white-meat poultry, legumes, tofu, fish, and low-fat yogurt—are good sources of lean protein. If you suffer from diabetes, lean proteins also help to regulate blood sugar levels. Fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel, and sardines are good for maintaining levels of Omega-3 acids, healthy fats the body needs but cannot produce on its own.

For specific types of neuropathy, research shows that specific antioxidants may help slow or even reverse nerve damage that has not existed for too long a time. For HIV sensory neuropathy, Acetyl-L-Carnitine has demonstrated good results, and Alpha lipoic acid is being studied for its effects on diabetic nerve damage. Consult your NeuropathyDR® specialist for the latest research before beginning any supplementation or treatment, even with antioxidants.

Use Tools Like Journaling and Blood Sugar Monitoring Every Day…

So what are the best ways to monitor what you are eating? The easiest way is to keep a food journal. Record everything you eat at meals, for snacks, and any vitamin supplements you might be taking. Your journal will help you and your NeuropathyDR® clinician determine if your diet could be a factor in your neuropathy symptoms! As a bonus, food journaling is a great way to be accountable for your overall nutrition, as well as to help avoid dietary-related conditions other than neuropathy. If you have a goal for weight loss, weight gain, or better overall energy, those are other areas in which keeping a food journal can help! Other ways to monitor what you eat include cooking at home as opposed to going out to restaurants, keeping a shopping list instead of deciding what groceries to buy at the store, and consulting a nutritionist or qualified NeuropathyDR® clinician about the best ways to meet your specific needs.

Dietary supplements can also help manage neuropathic symptoms and nerve degeneration. Supplementing B Vitamins, particularly vitamin B-12, can help regulate your nutrient levels and prevent neuropathy symptoms. Supplementing with fish oil can help replenish Omega-3 fatty acids, which are important if you suffer from type-II diabetes. Many other types of supplements can be beneficial if you suffer from neuropathy; consult your NeuropathyDR® clinician for specific recommendations.

Contact us if you have any questions about a proper neuropathic nutrition and diet plan. We can help you find the information you need and put you in touch with a NeuropathyDR® clinician who can help you with this and other neuropathy-related questions!

Join our conversation today on Facebook by clicking HERE!

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/peripheral-neuropathy/DS00131/DSECTION=lifestyle-and-home-remedies

http://www.foundationforpn.org/livingwithperipheralneuropathy/neuropathynutrition/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/82184-foods-fight-neuropathy/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/121841-nutrients-neuropathy/

Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet is a post from: #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment

The post Neuropathic Nutrition and Diet appeared first on #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment.

Got Autonomic Neuropathy?

Let a NeuropathyDR® specialist help you with autonomic neuropathy today.

oldercouple 300x233 Got Autonomic Neuropathy?Do any of these symptoms sound familiar?

∙ Dizziness and fainting when you stand up

∙ Difficulty digesting food and feeling really full when you’ve barely eaten anything

∙ Abnormal perspiration – either sweating excessively or barely at all

∙ Intolerance for exercise – no, not that you just hate it but your heart rate doesn’t adjust as it should

∙ Slow pupil reaction so that your eyes don’t adjust quickly to changes in light

∙ Urinary problems like difficulty starting or inability to completely empty your bladder

If they do, you could have autonomic neuropathy. Especially if you have diabetes, your immune system is compromised by chemotherapy, HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, lupus, Guillian-Barre or any other chronic medical condition.

You need to see a doctor immediately. A good place to start would be a physician well versed in diagnosing and treating nerve disease and damage, like your local NeuropathyDR® clinician.

What Is Autonomic Neuropathy?

Autonomic neuropathy in itself is not a disease[1]. It’s a type of peripheral neuropathy that affects the nerves that control involuntary body functions like heart rate, blood pressure, digestion and perspiration. The nerves are damaged and don’t function properly leading to a break down of the signals between the brain and the parts of the body affected by the autonomic nervous system like the heart, blood vessels, digestive system and sweat glands.

That can lead to your body being unable to regulate your heart rate or your blood pressure, an inability to properly digest your food, urinary problems, even being unable to sweat in order to cool your body down when you exercise.

Often, autonomic neuropathy is caused by other diseases or medical conditions so if you suffer from

∙ Diabetes

∙ Alcoholism

∙ Cancer

∙ Systemic lupus

∙ Parkinson’s disease

∙ HIV/AIDS

Or any number of other chronic illnesses, you stand a much higher risk of developing autonomic neuropathy.[2] Your best course of action is not to wait until you develop symptoms. Begin a course of preventative treatment and monitoring with a NeuropathyDR® clinician to lessen your chances of developing autonomic neuropathy.

How Will My NeuropathyDR® Diagnose My Autonomic Neuropathy?

If you have diabetes, cancer, HIV/AIDs or any of the other diseases or chronic conditions that can cause autonomic neuropathy, it’s much easier to diagnose autonomic neuropathy. After all, as a specialist in nerve damage and treatment, your NeuropathyDR® is very familiar with your symptoms and the best course of treatment.

If you have symptoms of autonomic neuropathy and don’t have any of the underlying conditions, your diagnosis will be a little tougher but not impossible.

Either way, your NeuropathyDR® clinician will take a very thorough history and physical. Make sure you have a list of all your symptoms, when they began, how severe they are, what helps your symptoms or makes them worse, and any and all medications your currently take (including over the counter medications, herbal supplements or vitamins).

Be honest with your NeuropathyDR® clinician about your diet, alcohol intake, frequency of exercise, history of drug use and smoking. If you don’t tell the truth, you’re not giving your NeuropathyDR® clinician a clear picture of your physical condition. That’s like asking them to drive you from Montreal to Mexico City without a map or a GPS. You may eventually get to where you want to be, but it’s highly unlikely.

Once your history and physical are completed, your NeuropathyDR® clinician will order some tests. Depending upon your actual symptoms and which systems seem to be affected, these tests might include:

∙ Ultrasound

∙ Urinalysis and bladder function tests

∙ Thermoregulatory and/or QSART sweat tests

∙ Gastrointestinal tests

∙ Breathing tests

∙ Tilt-table tests (to test your heart rate and blood pressure regulation)

Once your tests are completed and your NeuropathyDR® clinician determines you have autonomic neuropathy, it’s time for treatment.

Treatment and Prognosis

NeuropathyDR® clinicians are well versed in treating all types of peripheral neuropathy, including autonomic neuropathy. They adhere to a very specialized treatment protocol that was developed specifically for patients suffering from neuropathy. That’s why their treatments have been so successful – neuropathy in all its forms is what they do.

Autonomic neuropathy is a chronic condition but it can be treated and you can do things to help relieve your symptoms.

Your NeuropathyDR® clinician will work with you and your other physicians to treat your neuropathy and manage your underlying condition. They do this through:

∙ Diet Planning and Nutritional Support

You need to give your body the nutrition it needs to heal.

If you have gastrointestinal issues caused by autonomic neuropathy, you need to make sure you’re getting enough fiber and fluids to help your body function properly.

If you have diabetes, you need to follow a diet specifically designed for diabetics and to control your blood sugar.

If your autonomic neuropathy affects your urinary system, you need to retrain your bladder. You can do this by following a schedule of when to drink and when to empty your bladder to slowly increase your bladder’s capacity.

∙ Individually Designed Exercise Programs

If you experience exercise intolerance or blood pressure problems resulting from autonomic neuropathy, you have to be every careful with your exercise program. Make sure that you don’t overexert yourself, take it slowly. Your NeuropathyDR® clinician can design an exercise program specifically for you that will allow you to exercise but won’t push you beyond what your body is capable of. And, even more importantly, they will continually monitor your progress and adjust your program as needed.

∙ Lifestyle Modifications

If your autonomic neuropathy causes dizziness when you stand up, then do it slowly and in stages. Flex your feet or grip your hands several times before you attempt to stand to increase the flow of blood to your hands and feet. Try just sitting on the side of your bed in the morning for a few minutes before you try to stand.

Change the amount and frequency of your meals if you have digestive problems.

Don’t try to do everything all at once. Decide what really needs to be done each day and do what you can. Autonomic neuropathy is a chronic disorder and living with any chronic condition requires adaptations. Your NeuropathyDR® clinician knows this all too well and will work with you to manage your level of stress and change your daily routines to help you manage your condition and your life.

All of these changes in conjunction with medications, where needed, will make it easier to live with autonomic neuropathy and lessen the chances of serious complications. Early intervention with a NeuropathyDR® clinician is still the best policy if you have any of the underlying conditions that can cause autonomic neuropathy. But if you already have symptoms, start treatment immediately

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001780/

[2] http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/autonomic-neuropathy/

Join our conversation today on Facebook by clicking HERE!

Got Autonomic Neuropathy? is a post from: #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment

The post Got Autonomic Neuropathy? appeared first on #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment.

Neuropathy Treatment Plan

Make your Neuropathy Treatment Plan Today!

MatureCoupleLaptop 300x200 Neuropathy Treatment Plan

Those who use written neuropathy treatment plans have a far better chance at not only feeling better, but regaining significant quality of life.

If you or someone you love suffers from peripheral neuropathy, you know how devastating this condition can be. You probably are also aware of the immense life changes a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy can bring.

But the good news is, as you read on these pages repeatedly there is a whole lot you can learn to better deal with your peripheral neuropathy.

This is where having a written neuropathy treatment plan goes along way. In fact you could apply this to almost any illness.

Here’s what to do next:

First of all take out a large piece of paper, or even on mobile phone. Actually, in this stage I am a huge fan of mobile notes sync across all devices.

On your neuropathy treatment plan should first be all your known risk factors. This would include things like cigarette smoking, excess alcohol consumption, inactivity, and perhaps diabetes. Maybe there are other known factors, such as consumption of medications known to produce peripheral neuropathy.

Once you have your list, then you need to divide it into things that you can change. The very next thing you need to do is to prioritize your neuropathy treatment plan. For example what is having the biggest impact on your health?

This is the very first thing, although perhaps the most difficult that you need to do first.

By first developing a neuropathy treatment plan and then using your own willpower and discipline, along with the help from your family and healthcare professionals, you can do a whole lot to help yourself feel better and function better!

And this really is the entire premise of the Beating Neuropathy family. We are here to help and support you!

What we do know however is those who use written neuropathy treatment plans and not only work off them but share them with their neuropathy treatment specialists have a far better chance at not only feeling better, but regaining significant quality of life.

To that end, we are here to support you!

Join our conversation today on Facebook by clicking HERE!

Neuropathy Treatment Plan is a post from: #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment

The post Neuropathy Treatment Plan appeared first on #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment.

Got Diabetic Neuropathy?

Got Diabetic Neuropathy? Let one our our highly trained NeuropathyDR® specialists help you today!

mail.google.com  Got Diabetic Neuropathy?

If you have diabetes and you’re experiencing any of these symptoms:

– Diarrhea, nausea and vomiting

– Difficulty swallowing

– Deep pain, especially in your legs and feet

– Loss of sensation and ability to feel warmth or cold

– Muscle cramps

– Numbness, tingling or burning in your arms, hands, legs or feet

– Weakness

– Dizziness, especially when you try to stand up

– Drooping facial muscles

– Loss of bladder control

You could have diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is a type of peripheral neuropathy specific to patients who have diabetes. Typically, it’s caused by lack of blood flow to the nerves and elevated and uncontrolled blood sugar levels.

If left untreated, diabetic neuropathy can lead to debilitating nerve damage. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should seek treatment with a medical professional with experience in diagnosing and treating diabetic neuropathy like your local NeuropathyDR® clinician.

If your NeuropathyDR® specialist determines that you have diabetic neuropathy, it’s vital that you start treatment right away.

How Will My NeuropathyDR® Specialist Treat My Diabetic Neuropathy?

The first goal for treatment in diabetic neuropathy is to get your diabetes under control and keep it under control to slow the progression of any nerve damage. That means ensuring that you’re taking any prescribed medications and that you’re eating a diet specific to diabetes control.

A diet specific to diabetes control will include:

– Fresh vegetables

– Fresh fruit

– Lean meats

– High fiber

– Whole grains

– No sweets

Your NeuropathyDR® specialist has an exclusive treatment protocol with proven results for diabetic neuropathy patients. An integral part of that treatment protocol is nutrition counseling and diet planning. Your specialist will sit down with you and plan your meals to include the proper portions of each of these categories on a daily basis to make sure that your blood sugar remains as constant as possible.

Pain Reduction and Nerve Repair

Once you have your blood sugar control, the next part of the treatment protocol for your diabetic neuropathy is taking steps to reduce your symptoms and help the nerves repair themselves. This can be done through a combination of topical pain medications, manual manipulation of the bones and joints to properly align the nervous system and nerve stimulation.

Diet, proper alignment of the bones and muscles and nerve stimulation are all important aspects of successful treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

A Word To The Wise Diabetic Neuropathy Patient

If you are suffering from diabetic neuropathy, pay particular attention to your feet, hands, arms and legs and contact your NeuropathyDR® specialist immediately if you notice any blisters, sores, torn skin, or inflammation. The combination of your diabetes and your diabetic neuropathy can lead to very serious infections that are slow or impossible to heal. This can lead to dire complications that can be avoided if you receive the proper medical treatment early.

Make sure you’re doing a visual inspection and not relying on soreness or pain. Your diabetic neuropathy will impair your ability to feel pain in your extremities and you may not notice the problem until it’s too late for successful treatment.

Assess your current medical situation and take note of any of the symptoms we described. If you are experiencing any of these issues associated with diabetic neuropathy, contact your local NeuropathyDR® and take full advantage of their expertise in the treatment of peripheral neuropathies, including diabetic neuropathy.

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

Got Diabetic Neuropathy? is a post from: #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment

The post Got Diabetic Neuropathy? appeared first on #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment.

Do I Have Diabetic Neuropathy?

Diabetic neuropathy is a type of peripheral neuropathy specific to patients who have diabetes.

diabeticmeter 300x116 Do I Have Diabetic Neuropathy?

If you have diabetes and you have any of these symptoms[1]:

Diarrhea, nausea and vomiting
Difficulty swallowing
Deep pain, especially in your legs and feet
Loss of sensation and ability to feel warmth or cold
Muscle cramps
Numbness, tingling or burning in your arms, hands, legs or feet
Weakness
Dizziness, especially when you try to stand up
Drooping facial muscles
Loss of bladder control

You could have diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is a type of peripheral neuropathy specific to patients who have diabetes. If left untreated, diabetic neuropathy can lead to serious and possibly permanent nerve damage.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should seek treatment with a medical professional with experience in diagnosing and treating diabetic neuropathy like your local NeuropathyDR® clinician.

Why Does Diabetes Cause Neuropathy?

If your blood glucose levels aren’t controlled and have been high for significant period of time, the blood vessels that carry oxygen to your nerves can be damaged. Elevated blood glucose can also damage the sheath that covers and protects the nerves. That leaves them vulnerable to damage. Diabetic neuropathy is just the medical term for the nerve damage caused by elevated blood glucose levels.

What Happens to Your Body Once Those Nerves Are Damaged?

Diabetic neuropathy happens when the nervous system is damaged.

If your peripheral nervous system is damaged you can experience[2]

Numbness in your arms, hands, legs and feet
Inability to feel heat, cold or even pain in your arms, hands, legs and feet
Burning or tingling or even the “pins and needles” feeling you get when your legs or arms “go to sleep”
Changes in the shape of your feet caused by weakened muscles
Carpal tunnel syndrome

If your neuropathy affects your autonomic nervous system, you can experience

Digestive problems like nausea, vomiting, constipation or diarrhea
Erectile dysfunction
Irregular heart beat
Loss of bladder control
Inability to regulate your blood pressure

How Can You Reduce Your Risk of Diabetic Neuropathy?

The best defense against diabetic neuropathy is to get and keep your blood sugar under control. Your best bet for doing that is proper diet, strictly monitoring your blood sugar levels and always taking your diabetes medication as prescribed by your doctor.

A good diet for controlling your blood sugar includes:

Fresh fruit and vegetables
Lean meats
High fiber
Whole grains
No sweets

Your NeuropathyDR® Clinician is a specialist has an exclusive treatment protocol with proven results for diabetic neuropathy patients. An integral part of that treatment protocol is nutrition counseling and diet planning. Your specialist will sit down with you and plan your meals to include the proper portions of each of these categories on a daily basis to make sure that your blood sugar remains as constant as possible.

Assess your current medical situation and take note of any of the symptoms we described. If you are experiencing any of these issues associated with diabetic neuropathy, contact your local NeuropathyDR® and take full advantage of their expertise in the treatment of peripheral neuropathies, including diabetic neuropathy.

For more information on coping with diabetic neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.

[1] www.joslin.org/info/diabetic_neuropathy_nerve_damage_an_update.html

[2] http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/peripheralneuropathy/detail_peripheralneuropathy.html

Join the conversation on Facebook!

Do I Have Diabetic Neuropathy? is a post from: #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment

The post Do I Have Diabetic Neuropathy? appeared first on #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment.

Why Is Neuropathy Treatment Difficult?

Neuropathy treatment can be difficult for some due to the fact, neuropathy is more than one condition.

An understandable question that we get in the clinic day after day is Why is neuropathy treatment so difficult?

As you probably know a good portion of patients who suffers from some form of chronic intractable pain have peripheral neuropathy. One reasons for this includes the fact we’re living longer. Also in general, our health habits as so-called modern and developed nations have become worse, not better.

There’s also one major misconception that hampers neuropathy treatment for many and that is  misunderstanding that Neuropathy is actually one condition when indeed its many disorders.

Nothing, and I mean nothing can be further from the truth. You see neuropathy rarely occurs without cause. Sometimes the known causes are due to chemotherapy, cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, and other such things as liver and kidney disease.

Sometimes, neuropathy is secondary to known disease processes. One example is Lyme disease.

Most of us know that 60% to 70% of patients who have developed diabetes, ultimately also develop some form of peripheral neuropathy.

About 50% of the time we diagnose neuropathy as being idiopathic. Idiopathic means that we are not one hundred percent sure what caused the patients neuropathy. As we have discussed here many times before, at least half the time in idiopathic cases the cause of the #neuropathy is due to metabolic syndrome.

Metabolic syndrome is now so common and occurring in younger and younger ages that it is perhaps the most devastating health condition that we as a society must face head-on. Excess sugar and carbohydrate consumption along with decreasing physical activity is having a huge impact on society as a whole.

And too often even otherwise brilliant physicians ignore this as a possible cause of the patients underlying health conditions. Everything from neuropathy to heart disease can directly be related to metabolic syndrome.

And that is the reason in which many patients find neuropathy treatment so difficult.

Don’t let this be you. Start today by making stronger and more informed decisions. In a nutshell, do your homework, do your research and do everything you possibly can advocate for your health and effective #neuropathytreatment!

Join the conversation all day on Facebook!

Why Is Neuropathy Treatment Difficult? is a post from: #1 Neuropathy & Pain Treatment

The post Why Is Neuropathy Treatment Difficult? appeared first on #1 Neuropathy & Pain Treatment.

Got Neuropathy? You May Need To Consider Weight Loss!

Many patients with peripheral neuropathy discover is that weight loss can accelerate healing, reduce pain, and dramatically improve quality of life.

girl apple scale 236x300 Got Neuropathy? You May Need To Consider Weight Loss!

Amazingly, one of the things that most patients who suffer from peripheral neuropathy discover is that weight loss can accelerate their healing, reduce their pain, and dramatically improve the quality of their life.

Now, this is true for many forms of peripheral neuropathy, especially those associated with diabetes or metabolic syndrome.

The reasons for this are many.

But here are three reasons why you should consider weight loss if you suffer from neuropathy, or ANY form of chronic pain.

Number one: Being even as little as 10 to 15 pounds overweight can help create an inflammatory environment in your body. Inflammation causes pain, which sets the stage for more devastating diseases.

In fact, I have had patients present to my practice with significant widespread aches and pains, whose only medical issue was being overweight. Their inflammatory blood markers (CRP), much like those who suffer from inflammatory arthritis and other devastating diseases, are often significantly elevated.

An inflammatory environment in our bodies helps create symptoms including achiness, fatigue, and other bothersome issues—which many patients simply accept as normal.

Being even a little overweight will also aggravate any underlying pain syndromes, like peripheral neuropathy. Simply by losing weight, you can correct much of this pro-inflammatory situation!

Second, you probably already understand that being overweight makes it much more difficult for you to maintain normal blood and blood sugar levels. Elevations in both of these, especially triglycerides and blood sugars over many years, can lead to the development of, or worsening of, peripheral neuropathy.

The third, and perhaps most powerful, reason to consider weight loss is, by losing weight, we significantly reduce our risks of devastating diseases including diabetes, heart disease, and many forms of cancer.

As we recently published, the NeuropathyDR diet solution is one that is very effective.

In fact, we’ve had patients tell us they lose as much as 5 to 8 pounds in just several days after beginning and following our diet. In case you missed it, you’ll find that at http://neuropathydr.com/the-neuropathydr-diet.

One of the last, and most compelling, reasons to consider weight loss is, like most patients, you’ll likely experience more energy, less fatigue, drop your blood pressure, and perhaps even improve other conditions without more drugs, including health issues such as fibromyalgia and sleep apnea.

Remember we are ready to help, when you are!

Join the conversation on Facebook!

Got Neuropathy? You May Need To Consider Weight Loss! is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

“It’s Just a Slight Tingling, Maybe It Will Go Away…”

Nowhere else can this attitude be as dangerous as in your health—especially when dealing with peripheral neuropathy and related disorders.

distressedlady 300x225 “It’s Just a Slight Tingling, Maybe It Will Go Away…”

Now, those of you who read us regularly know that sudden onset of tingling, or other “funny” symptoms could be a medical emergency, like a stroke. That’s why an accurate diagnosis is your FIRST imperative!

What I’m talking about here is the cases where we see patients who “blow off” their own self-care, including available good neuropathy treatment!

Sometimes it’s finances, lack of family—or, even physician—support, but all too often it’s not wanting to make the emotional or time investment in learning all about YOUR type of neuropathy, then focusing like a laser on the things you CAN do!

First, you really have to know what you are dealing with. We do know that better health habits, regardless of your diagnosis, make an incredible difference. That’s why an accurate diagnosis is imperative!

For example, almost universally, we know that diabetic and MANY OTHER neuropathy patients who avoid dairy, gluten, and get strict with what and how they eat, get the best neuropathy treatment results! And this is even MORE true in the case of metabolic syndrome, or pre-diabetes, which is now epidemic.

Another area we feel VERY strongly about is that most neuropathy patients should at least try a gentle electric neurostimulator! 

So much so, I have even invented a brand new one! But, more on that next month.

Yes, you can even lease or rent these from us! You’ll find everything at http://neuropathydr.com/homecare

Now, when this type of home care is coupled with great clinicians, manual therapies and rehab, laser therapy, and therapeutic nutrition, you are PUSHING your body in the direction of healing, wherever that is possible!

So, why NOT do everything you can do to help beat your neuropathy early? The longer you wait, or if you just dampen the symptoms with medication, the more difficult feeling better will be!

Our clinics are always ready to help you with great in office treatment plans and home care kits AND many specialized, viable treatments!

A complimentary 15-minute Neuropathy Analysis, lease or rental of related equipment, and even no-interest financing are available in most NeuropathyDR® Treatment centers for any non-covered services, supplies, and equipment!

We are more than happy to discuss YOUR neuropathy treatment needs with your personal physicians, too!

Join the conversation on Facebook!

“It’s Just a Slight Tingling, Maybe It Will Go Away…” is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

#Neuropathy And The Blood Sugar Connection Part II

#Diabetes and metabolic syndrome are two diseases that are becoming much more common.

healthymeal1 300x200  #Neuropathy And The Blood Sugar Connection Part II

Although there are genetic contributions, most of the time metabolic syndrome and diabetes develop because of a declining level of physical fitness and carrying around too much body fat.

Our so-called modern high-fat and high sugar diets are a big contribution. Most adults need only 2000 calories or so per day yet some people consume as much as 6000 calories or more per day for years on end.

Diabetes and it’s precursor called the metabolic syndrome, are two diseases that are becoming much more common as the result of consuming too many calories and lack of physical activity and exercise.

One of the most devastating things that tens to happen as a direct result of metabolic syndrome and in a large number of patients who suffer from diabetes is peripheral neuropathy.

Most often this does not happen overnight. It takes many years for these to develop and by that time, considerable damage often has been done. This is why it is so important to control your calorie intake and maintain the highest level of physical activity. You can at any age!

Once the damage from elevated blood sugar is done, simply getting sugars under control is not enough! This is a myth that both physicians and patients alike don’t fully understand. There are good studies that show 75% of time just getting sugars control is not enough – you could be left with significant pain and disability just by treating the elevated blood sugar!

This is where a comprehensive NeuropathyDR Treatment plan may help you substantially!

So isn’t it time you learn all you can about #neuropathy treatment in advance?

Remember, we are here to help.

We will do everything in our power to help nurse you back to health, but YOU must reach out and grab all these tools!

Otherwise you run the risk of suffering miserably for the rest of your life.

Harsh words? Yes.

But it is the truth.

post your comments and questions on Facebook!

#Neuropathy And The Blood Sugar Connection Part II is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists