Postherpetic Neuropathy (Pain After Shingles)

A NeuropathyDR specialist is here to help you with your Postherpetic Neuropathy Including nutrition and diet plan.

close up pommegranate citrus salad1 300x200 Postherpetic Neuropathy (Pain After Shingles)

When you were diagnosed with shingles, you thought that as soon as the rash disappeared you would be free and clear…

You didn’t count on the nerve damage and pain you’re still dealing with.

The pain of postherpetic neuropathy.

You’re frustrated…depressed…irritable.

Yes, you know you can take pain medications to help ease some of the discomfort but you don’t want to do that forever.

The good news is that there are other things you can do to help your body heal.  With a little patience, perseverance and the help of medical professionals well versed in dealing with postherpetic neuropathy, like your local NeuropathyDR™ specialist, you can live a normal life again.

It Starts With Good Nutrition

The human body is a very well designed machine.  If you put junk into it, you get junk out of it.  But if you give it what it needs to function properly and to repair itself, the results can be awe inspiring.

The very first thing you need to do is make sure you’re giving your body the right tools to fight back against postherpetic neuropathy.  And that means a healthy diet.

Your diet should include[1]:

–           Whole grains and legumes to provide B vitamins to promote nerve health.  Whole grains promote the production of serotonin in the brain and will increase your feeling of well-being.

–           Fish and eggs for additional vitamins B12 and B1.

–           Green, leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, and other greens) for calcium and magnesium.   Both of these nutrients are vital to healthy nerve endings and health nerve impulse  transmission and, as an added bonus, they give your immune system a boost.

–           Yellow and orange fruits and vegetables (such as squash, carrots, yellow and orange bell  peppers, apricots, oranges, etc.) for vitamins A and C to help repair your skin and boost  your immune system.

–           Sunflower seeds (unsalted), avocados, broccoli, almonds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, peanuts (unsalted), tomatoes and tomato products, sweet potatoes and fish for vitamin E to promote skin health and ease the pain of postherpetic neuropathy.

–           Ask your neuropathy specialist for recommendations on a good multivitamin and mineral supplement to fill in any gaps in your nutrition plan.

Foods you should avoid[2]:

–           Coffee and other caffeinated drinks.

–           Fried foods and all other fatty foods.  Fatty foods suppress the immune system and that’s the last thing you need when you’re fighting postherpetic neuropathy.

–           Cut back on animal protein.  That’s not to say you should become a vegetarian.  Just limit the amount of animal protein you take in.  High-protein foods elevate the amount of  dopamine and norepinephrine which are both tied to high levels of anxiety and stress.

–           Avoid drinking alcohol.  Alcohol consumption limits the ability of the liver to remove toxins from the body and can make a bad situation worse.

–           Avoid sugar.  You don’t have to eliminate sweets completely, just control them.  Sugar contains no essential nutrients and “gunks up” your system.  Keeping your blood sugar level constant will help control your irritability.

–           Control your salt intake.  Opt for a salt substitute with potassium instead of sodium and stay away from preserved foods like bacon, ham, pickles, etc.  Reducing the amount of  salt you eat will help ease inflammation and that alone will work wonders in the healing process.

Talk to your local NeuropathyDR™ treatment specialist for a personalized diet plan to help you to help your body to heal with the right nutritional support for postherpetic neuropathy.

Give Your Body A Break by Managing Stress

We all know that stress is a killer.  But few of us really take steps to manage the stress in our lives.  By keeping your stress level under control, you give your body a chance to use the resources it was using to deal with stress to actually heal itself.

Some tips for managing your stress level:

–           Exercise regularly.  You don’t have to get out and run a marathon.  Just walk briskly for about 15 minutes a day, every day, to start.  You can build from there.

–           Employ relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, tai chi, yoga or meditation.  Any of these will calm the mind and, in turn, calm the body and nerves.

–          Find a hobby that will take your mind off your pain.
Ask your local NeuropathyDR™ clinician for suggestions and make stress management a part of your treatment plan to overcome postherpetic neuropathy. But remember, healing is a process not an event.  Be patient with yourself and start the healing process today.

We hope this gives you some tips to get started on the road to putting postherpetic neuropathy behind you.  Working with your medical team, including your local NeuropathyDR™ specialist, to design a nutrition and treatment plan tailored to your specific needs is a great place to start.

For more information on recovering from shingles and postherpetic neuropathy, get our Free E-Book and subscription to the Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy”.


[1] http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/shingles/default.htm

[2] http://www.healingwithnutrition.com/sdisease/shingles/shingles.html

Postherpetic Neuropathy (Pain After Shingles) is a post from: #1 in Neuropathy & Chronic Pain Treatment

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Chemotherapy Neuropathy Part II

Your local NeuropathyDR® specialist can help you understand Chemotherapy Neuropathy Treatments

ndgenkit6 300x228 Chemotherapy Neuropathy Part IILast time, we talked about some therapies that can help alleviate chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The precise combination of these complementary therapies in NeuropathyDR® protocol can bring relief from your peripheral neuropathy and put you back on the road to a full life.

Nutrition

As a cancer patient, you’re already familiar with the effects chemotherapy and other treatments can have on your digestive system. The side effects of cancer treatment can not only affect your ability to eat but they can also prevent your body from getting the nutrition you need to heal.

If you have cancer, you need to make sure you’re getting enough nutrients to prevent or reverse nutritional shortfalls, lessen the side effects of treatment and improve your quality of life.

If at all possible, you need to make sure you’re eating enough high calorie, high-protein foodto give your body proper nutrition. But sitting down and eating a big meal may not be possible. Try eating small meals or snacks frequently instead. Frequent small meals will give your body a steady supply of nutrients, be easier for your sensitive digestive system to handle and maintain a consistent blood sugar level. All of this will often make you feel much better.

Talk to your local NeuropathyDR® clinician to discuss a meal plan that will give your body what it needs to repair the damage done by cancer treatment. Good nutrition will boost your immune system and let it do its job in fighting off illnesses brought on by the damage of chemotherapy.

NeuropathyDR® practitioners often use diet plans and our nutrition guidelines to complement their chiropractic and NDGen treatment protocols to treat the whole patient from the inside out.

Nerve Stimulation (Neurostimulation or NeuroStim)

Once a NeuropathyDR® course of treatment has been designed and a nutrition plan established, the final piece in the overall treatment of your post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy treatment plan is nerve stimulation.

There are several nerve stimulation techniques to help peripheral neuropathy patients. Our protocol that is having great success includes the NDGen Family of Neurostimulation Devices.

By employing electrical stimulation to the nerves, in a wave-like low frequency motion the nerves may be stimulated to heal wherever possible. This specialty treatment allows the nerves to communicate more normally again and that, in itself, seems to start the process of reversing some damage of peripheral neuropathy.

You may watch our Cancer Patients speak out at http://YouTube.com/NeuropathyDoctor

The combination of good NeuropathyDR® in-clinic care, nutrition and NDGen nerve stimulation and Laser/LED Therapy is showing great promise in helping post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy patients return to a pain free life, without the debilitating effects of post-chemotherapy peripheral  neuropathy.

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Chemotherapy Neuropathy Part I

Are you suffering from

chemotherapy neuropathy?

Let a NeuropathyDR® specialist help you today!

distressedlady 300x225 Chemotherapy Neuropathy Part I

You could be suffering from peripheral neuropathy caused by the very same drugs that saved your life.

If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, your diagnosis was just the beginning of a long battle…

Surgery…

Chemotherapy…

Radiation…

Hormone therapy…

These are all weapons in your fight against a dreaded disease.

But what you may not have realized is that these treatments, especially chemotherapy, can have some serious side effects. Side effects in addition to the nausea, hair loss, etc., that first come to mind. If you’ve completed your chemotherapy treatment and you’re now suffering from:

  • Tingling and/or burning in your hands and/or feet
  • Pain in your nerves
  • Loss of the sense of touch or an inability to feel vibration
  • Temperature changes in the flesh –extremities that are excessively warm or cold
  • Side effects from pain medication that cause insomnia or difficulty staying asleep

You could be suffering from peripheral neuropathy caused by the very same drugs that saved your life.

The good news is that your peripheral neuropathy can be treated. Many chemotherapy neuropathy patients are finding relief with combined therapies of

  • Specialized NeuropathyDR® Treatment Center Care
  • Nutrition Therapy
  • Nerve stimulation therapy, such as the NDGen Family of Devices
  • Laser and LED (LLLT)

The precise combination of these complementary therapies in NeuropathyDR® protocol can bring relief from your peripheral neuropathy and put you back on the road to a full life.

To understand the effectiveness and importance of these complementary therapies in treating your post-chemotherapy peripheral neuropathy, it helps to understand each piece of the therapy “puzzle”…

Manual Therapy by a Trained Professional

Chances are very good that if, in your pre-cancer life, you never suffered a sports injury or some other type of injury or accident, you may have never been treated by a highly trained chiropractor or physical therapist who uses specialty neuropathy care.

Traditionally, these professionals have diagnosed and treated injuries and illnesses affecting the bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons and joints. By employing a gentle manipulation of the spine and other joints, our professionals will assist your body in healing itself.

We use exercises, and manual manipulation of your joints and muscles to help realign the spine and put your bones and joints back into more natural movement.

Cancer patients are increasingly turning to chiropractors and physical therapists as their team to alleviate pain and the stress of not only their cancer but also the side effects resulting from their course of treatment. While this cannot prevent or cure cancer, it can help you deal with the symptoms and pain associated with cancer. By addressing a healthy spine and joints, proper treatment promotes a healthy nervous system and that’s a basic building block for regaining your pre-cancer health.

Your local NeuropathyDR® practitioner is a highly trained specialist and can design a personalized program around your needs to treat your peripheral neuropathy symptoms.

Next time, we’ll talk about nutrition therapy and nerve stimulation. Join the conversation and share your experience on our Facebook page.

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Neuropathy Treatment Basics – Make A Better Plan!

Help Yourself Today by Making a Neuropathy Treatment Plan

MatureCoupleLaptop 300x200 Neuropathy Treatment Basics   Make A Better Plan!

Neuropathy Treatment Basics

If you or someone you love suffers from peripheral neuropathy then you understand how difficult it can be. You know the story all too well; Pain, tingling, numbness, burning, and sleepless nights. Maybe even your walking has been affected. So starting today make a neuropathy treatment list of all the things you can do to help yourself.

Most of the time neuropathy is a slowly progressing situation. Many patients look back and find that their symptoms have been developing for many years.

Other times it’s sudden. Some cases can result from chemotherapy, certain medications (most especially statins, antihypertensives, and some antibiotics) and yes, even accidents.

Chemotherapy related neuropathy also often comes on suddenly.

Because we treat patients with neuropathy every day, we understand it’s easy to become overwhelmed and I’m sure it seems like you are always searching for answers too.

Neuropathy can also be caused by so many other health conditions. Things like viruses, rheumatoid arthritis, and even certain bacterial and viral infections. It takes a really good clinician to sort out everything that’s going on with every patient, to help you get an accurate diagnosis and the most effective treatment.

But there are some things you can actually do immediately!

The most important thing you need to do is to take a look at your overall health habits. And we strongly recommend you start by making a Neuropathy Treatment list.

Regardless of what caused your underlying health problems, things such as quitting smoking, starting to stress management program, improving your diet most especially by limiting sugars and starches, and becoming more physically active all can be very helpful!

This will also help your NeuropathyDR clinician take the best care of you possible.

So what’s the best Neuropathy treatment you can do for yourself today?

Start by making a neuropathy treatment list of all the things you can do to help yourself, beginning today! To help yourself the most, be sure to continue to update your neuropathy treatment plan as your health habits get better and better!

Join the conversation all day on Facebook!

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Neuropathy? Why did I get it?

In fact, neuropathy is a group of disorders.

neurodrProfessionals webready 300x86 Neuropathy? Why did I get it?

A question we get all the time is, why did I get neuropathy?

If you read advertisements in the popular press then you would likely believe neuropathy is one condition. As we have discussed many times before and will discuss again today, nothing could be further from the truth. In fact neuropathy is actually a group of disorders.

Neuropathy is the term that simply refers to nerve function gone wrong. Of course this is a gross oversimplification but I’m sure you get the picture.

The known causes of neuropathy include diabetes, certain medications; including some chemotherapy, poisonings from things such as heavy metals and some insecticides.

There are also some devastating forms of neuropathy that are genetic. Most commonly this is the CMT family of neuropathies.

But perhaps the most common cause of neuropathy and the reason for many more cases of neuropathy now appearing each year is the general decline in fitness in our adult population resulting in metabolic syndrome or pre-diabetes.

As doctors we commonly assign half the cases of neuropathy we see to metabolic syndrome. As you probably have read about here before metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, or syndrome X, are all the same condition.

In a nutshell, this serious health problem occurs either in very tiny time increments or over a long period of time when body fat increases and with it brings elevations in blood fats and blood sugars.

But the sad part is we are seeing it in younger and younger ages. Unfortunately, now we are seeing patients in their 30’s developing peripheral neuropathy!

One other factor that is imperative to note: Most patients we see in the clinic have several different potential causes of peripheral neuropathy. For one example, district cigarette smoking. Example two is the consumption of statin or anti-hypertensive drugs. And three, excess body fat and decrease in lean muscle mass as a result of years of poor health habits.

And here is the answer to the title question:

You may never know completely with 100% accuracy what caused your neuropathy.

However, you now know about some of the critical factors that need to be addressed in order to boost your potential for healing and recovery.

Here at NeuropathyDR this our ongoing job for you!

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Neuropathy? Why did I get it? is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Could Your Digestive Problems Be Caused by Autonomic Neuropathy?

Gastric bypass surgery has brought on a whole new subset of patients who suffer from G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy.

So…

You finally bit the bullet and had gastric bypass surgery…

Or maybe you opted for the lap band…

mail 51 Could Your Digestive Problems Be Caused by Autonomic Neuropathy?Everything went really well with the surgery and now you’re back home and on your way to your new life and brand new you.

You started to lose weight almost immediately and you couldn’t be happier with the results.

You knew you’d have some side effects[1] but you really didn’t expect anything you couldn’t handle.

But you never expected:

•      Heartburn

•      Bloating

•      Nausea and/or vomiting

•      Difficulty in swallowing because your esophagus no longer functions properly

•      Inability to empty your stomach

•      Diarrhea

•      Constipation

None of these symptoms is pleasant.  And what’s even worse is that they can last from days to weeks on end.

You knew you needed to take off the weight but it’s beginning to feel like it might not have been worth it.

They warned you about possible side effects but one they may not have mentioned could be causing one or several of your symptoms.

Your problems could be a result of Gastrointestinal or G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy.

Exactly What Does That Mean?

It means that your body is suffering from nutritional deficiencies caused by the lack of certain nutrients and vitamins.  The bypass surgery or lap band procedure may have stopped your body from taking in too much food, but it also substantially reduced the amount of nutrients and vitamins you’re getting from your food.

You no longer take in enough food with the nutrition your body needs[2].  When that happens, the body begins to break down.  One of the many issues you can develop due to what is basically malnutrition is G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy.  The nerves, specifically the Vagus Nerve is damaged by the lack of nutrition and it begins to malfunction.  That means difficulty in digesting food, difficulty in swallowing, an inability to eliminate waste properly…

Basically an inability of the digestive system to do anything it was designed to do.

Before the advent of gastric bypass surgery and lap band procedures, most people who developed G.I. Autonomic neuropathy or other types of neuropathy were diabetics, alcoholics or they live in countries where malnutrition was common.

Now gastric bypass surgery has brought on a whole new subset of patients who suffer from G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy.

The Nutrients You Probably Lack

G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy is usually caused by deficiencies in:

•           Vitamin B1 or Thiamine

•          Vitamin B3

•          Vitamin B6

•          Vitamin B12

•          Vitamin E

Many of the symptoms caused by your G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy can be lessened and possibly even controlled by a healthy diet and management of whatever underlying condition you have that could be contributing to your neuropathy.

What If You’re Not a Gastric Bypass Patient But You Have These Symptoms

What if you haven’t had gastric bypass or lap band surgery but you still have the symptoms we talked about above?  If you have

•     A history of alcohol abuse

•     Hepatitis C

•     Crohn’s Disease

•     Celiac Disease

And you’re having the problems we discussed above contact your doctor immediately.  Ask him to test to make sure that you are indeed suffering from nerve damage that could be linked to any of these causes.  Once that diagnosis has been made, ask them about treatment options.

Treatment Options

A highly skilled medical professional well versed in diagnosing and treating nerve damage is your best place to start for treatment of your G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy.  An excellent place to start is with a NeuropathyDr clinician.  They have had great success in treating patients with your symptoms using a multipronged approach that includes:

•      Care and correction for your muscular and skeletal systems

•      Treatment for any underlying medical problems

•      Nutrition education and diet planning

•      A step by step exercise regimen

•      Medication as needed or necessary

If you have a confirmed diagnosis of Gastrointestinal Autonomic Neuropathy or think you may have it, you don’t have to just live with it.  In fact, just living with it could be downright dangerous due to intestinal blockages, continued malnutrition, etc.  Contact us today for information on how G.I. Autonomic Neuropathy can be treated, your suffering lessened and exactly how to find a NeuropathyDR in your area.

Could Your Digestive Problems Be Caused by Autonomic Neuropathy? is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Pain Management Options for the Peripheral Neuropathy Patient

Fotolia 36770769 S 300x199 Pain Management Options for the Peripheral Neuropathy Patient

If you’re a patient suffering from peripheral neuropathy as a result of

 

·           Diabetes

·           Post-chemotherapy

·           Shingles

·           Guillian Barre Syndrome

·           HIV

·           Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

·           Or any other peripheral neuropathic pain

One of your greatest challenges (other than dealing with the pain and disruption of your normal daily activities) may be finding a medical professional to treat you with empathy and a real understanding of what you’re dealing with as a peripheral neuropathy sufferer.

Neuropathy pain can be hard to describe and even harder to measure.  You can’t put a number on it and you can’t always give a concrete definition or explanation for your symptoms.  That makes it difficult for the medical community, a community of science, to effectively treat you as a neuropathy patient.

The difficulty in finding a doctor well versed in treating peripheral neuropathy, in all its various forms, can make your life an exercise in frustration.  Not only are you dealing with your peripheral neuropathy pain but you can’t find anyone to treat you with any success.

It might help to know what your treatment options are so you can interview your potential treater with some background knowledge about the pain management options available to you as a neuropathy patient.

Here are some of the options for pain management in peripheral neuropathy patients:

Medication[1]

The first line of therapy for peripheral neuropathy patients is usually pain medication, sometimes in combination with antidepressants.  There has been some success with drugs used to treat epilepsy as well as opioids.  Opioids may be effective but the dosages are very high and only help specific patients.

Always ask your treating physician about side effects from any medication prescribed.  Many of the drugs used to treat neuropathy pain can have serious side effects and you need to take that into consideration before you use them.

Topical Treatments

Some creams can be help if you have small areas affected by your neuropathy.

Topical treatments usually don’t provide long lasting relief so talk to your doctor about a more permanent therapy if that doesn’t interest you. The exception are the cremes used in conjunction with the NeuropathyDR Treatments you’ll find HERE

Physical Therapy

Study after study has shown that active people heal faster.  Period.  By exercising your muscles, you will more easily adapt to your other physical limitations such as balance or gait issues.

Another benefit of physical therapy is that by keeping your muscles active and loose, you are less likely to suffer from severe muscle spasms, a common symptom in neuropathy patients.

But be prepared.  NOT all PT is good and many PTs are NOT trained to help Neuropathy specifically.

When you first begin a course of physical therapy to treat your neuropathy pain, you will probably experience a little more pain than usual.  You probably haven’t used those muscles in a while and they’re adapting to the treatment.  If you need a boost in your pain medication until the muscle pain subsides, ask for it.

Psychotherapy[2]

Chronic pain or chronic illness leads to depression in many neuropathy patients.  Treating the psychological aspects of your peripheral neuropathy pain is just as important as treating the physical symptoms.  Any successful pain management therapy should include psychological counseling.  Ask your doctor for a referral to a good therapist to talk about the emotional and psychological aspects of your neuropathy.  You’re not overreacting to your pain and you’re not imagining it!

Other and “Alternative” Therapies

A good body/mind therapy regimen can be really helpful in dealing with your peripheral neuropathy.  Consider yoga, acupuncture, relaxation techniques, hypnosis, or any other meditation technique as a complement to your pain management program.  Any of these alternative therapies can increase the production of endorphins in your brain and help the body manage your pain in unison with any other medical treatment.

Neurostimulation And Laser

Applying small amounts energy via light AND or electrical stimulation (NDGen(TM) in various shapes or waves to the nerves and muscles may be successful in cutting pain levels dramatically and aiding them in functioning normally again. There are home AND clinic options with this unique tool!

Far from ordinary TENS, this combination treatment when properly applied cuts pain often dramatically and may even stimulate the nerve to function more normally again.

Learn more about the NDGen™ Home and Clinic treatment protocol or better yet, go visit a NeuropathyDR clinician in your area.

Our NeuropathyDR Clinician is a specialist in using the NDGen™ treatment protocol to cut your pain and drug use in many cases helping them to function more normally again.

For more information on coping with your peripheral neuropathy, get your Free E-Book and subscription to our Bi-Weekly Ezine “Beating Neuropathy” at http://neuropathydr.com.


[1][1][1][1] See www.touchneurology.com/articles/treatment-options-neuropathy-patients

 

[2] See http://www.supportiveoncology.net/journal/articles/0102107.pdf

Pain Management Options for the Peripheral Neuropathy Patient is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Peripheral Neuropathy and Your Quality of Life

There are things you can do to lessen the physical (and emotional) effects of peripheral neuropathy and help you function as normally as possible!

If you’re suffering from peripheral neuropathy, you know how much it affects your life.

Every single day…

oldercouple 300x233 Peripheral Neuropathy and Your Quality of LifeEven the simplest tasks can be difficult if not impossible…

To anyone unfamiliar with peripheral neuropathy and its symptoms, they might just think “your nerves hurt a little…”

But at a peripheral neuropathy sufferer, you know better…

Peripheral neuropathy not only affects your health, it can wreck your quality of life.

How Do You Define Quality of Life?

Generally speaking, Quality of Life is a term used to measure a person’s overall well-being. In medical terms, it usually means how well a patient has adapted to a medical condition.  It measures[1]:

  • Your physical and material well being
  • Your social relationships – how you interact with others
  • Your social activities
  • Your personal fulfillment – your career, any creative outlets you may have, how involved you are with other interests)
  • Your recreational activities – your hobbies, sports, etc.
  • Your actual health – what your health is really like and how healthy you believe you are

How do you feel about these aspects of your life?  Your attitude and approach to your illness, both your neuropathy and the underlying cause of your neuropathy (i.e., diabetes, HIV/AIDS, lupus, etc.) can make a huge difference in how well you adapt to your neuropathy symptoms.

Neuropathy Symptoms Aren’t Just Physical

The pain of peripheral neuropathy falls into the category of what is considered chronic pain.  It usually doesn’t just come and go.  You can’t just pop a couple of aspirin and forget about it.  It’s pain with its root cause in nerve damage.

The nerves that actually register pain are the actual cause of the pain.  When you’re in that kind of pain on a consistent basis, it affects you in many different ways[2]:

  • You become depressed and/or anxious
  • Your productivity and interest at work is disrupted
  • You can’t sleep
  • It’s difficult for you to get out and interact with other people so you feel isolated
  • You sometimes don’t understand why you’re not getting better

What You Can Do To Improve Your Quality of Life

You may feel like your situation is hopeless, especially if you’ve become mired in depression.

But it isn’t.

There are things you can do to lessen the physical (and emotional) effects of peripheral neuropathy and help you function as normally as possible:

  • Pay special attention to caring for your feet.  Inspect them daily for cuts, pressure spots, blisters or calluses (use a mirror to look at the bottom of your feet). The minute you notice anything out of the ordinary, call your doctor or your local NeuropathyDR® clinician for help.  Never go barefoot – anywhere.
  • Treat yourself to a good foot massage to improve your circulation and reduce pain.  Check with your insurance company – if massage is actually prescribed by your doctor, they may cover some of the cost.
  • Only wear shoes that are padded, supportive and comfortable and never wear tight socks.
  • If you smoke, quit.  Nicotine decreases circulation and if you’re a peripheral neuropathy patient, you can’t risk that.
  • Cut back on your caffeine intake.  Several studies have found that caffeine may actually make neuropathy pain worse.
  • If you sit at a desk, never cross your knees or lean on your elbows.  The pressure will only make your nerve damage worse.
  • Be really careful when using hot water.  Your peripheral neuropathy may affect the way you register changes in temperature and it’s really easy for you to burn yourself and not even realize it.
  • Use a “bed cradle” to keep your sheets away from your feet if you experience pain when trying to sleep.  That will help you rest.
  • Try to be as active as possible.  Moderate exercise is great for circulation and it can work wonders for your emotional and mental health.
  • Make your home as injury proof as possible – install bath assists and/or hand rails and never leave anything on the floor that you can trip over.
  • Eat a healthy, balanced diet.  If you don’t know what you should and shouldn’t eat, talk to your NeuropathyDR® clinician about a personalized diet plan to maintain proper weight and give your body what it needs to heal.
  • Try to get out as often as possible to socialize with others.

We hope this information helps you to better manage your peripheral neuropathy symptoms.  Take a look at the list above and see how many of these things you’re already doing to help yourself. Then talk to your local NeuropathyDR® clinician about help with adding the others to your daily life.

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Peripheral Neuropathy and Your Quality of Life is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

The Missing Link in Neuropathy and Chronic Pain Treatment

A real neuropathy treatment strategy is one that incorporates lifestyle, self-care, and attention to key components of health and wellness.

One of the most frustrating things that we commonly only see in the clinic is when patients with fibromyalgia, neuropathy, or other forms of chronic pain lack a treatment strategy.

Fotolia 23644588 XS 200x300 The Missing Link in Neuropathy and Chronic Pain TreatmentA real treatment strategy is one that incorporates lifestyle, self-care, and attention to key components of health and wellness including diet nutrition, and exercise. The strategy is something that is followed virtually every day, and is non-cancelable.

Neuropathy, chronic pain, and fibromyalgia treatment strategies give patients a game plan with rules and schedules to follow.

Far too few neuropathy and chronic pain patients are treated this way. Quite frankly, it’s because no health care professional has ever explained to the patient how important it is to make sure that key healing strategies must be in place—and followed on daily basis.

So, far too often, patients go for years taking various prescriptions and never changing some of the fundamental reasons they became sick in the first place.

The largest issue here is that too many healthcare professionals themselves are not knowledgeable in all these areas. Traditional healthcare education does not focus on incorporating all these key points of patient care.

Furthermore, our current public health care system is so overburdened with regulations and documentation that routine visits leave little time for what should arguably be the most important part of helping our patients get better!

This is why it is essential that you choose your neuropathy and chronic pain treatment specialist wisely.

Be the patient who requests extra time, does their homework, investigates the background of their practitioners, and really gets to know them and understand why they do what they do.

This is also why we train neuropathy, chronic pain, and fibromyalgia treatment specialists at NeuropathyDR®.

As you can see by now, it requires many different skillsets and lots of specialized training to truly help patients like yourself—you deserve so much!

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The Missing Link in Neuropathy and Chronic Pain Treatment is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists

Moving from Helplessness to Empowerment

Neuropathy patients both consciously and unconsciously feel out of control.

Recently, I had the opportunity to film a video, and write an article about “learned helplessness”. Learned helplessness was discovered many years ago, as a response by animals that are under tremendous stress. In a nutshell, this is a behavioral response that occurs when animals or in fact people believe there is no way out of their current situation.

pain 200x300 Moving from Helplessness to EmpowermentUnfortunately, too much of drug advertisements and naming of this syndrome and that syndrome, a pill for this and pill for that mentality has led many patients to believe they have 10 more things wrong with them. And the reality is so often many conditions for which patients are treated have single underlying causes!

These could include things like acute infection, inflammation, elevated blood sugars, and perhaps even genetic disorders. More often than not, it is simply the accumulation of years of poor health habits.

But all of this consumer direct drug advertising helps make patients both consciously and unconsciously feel out of control. This is not healthy, not by a long shot.

No this is not to say that sometimes multiple medications are not necessary.

I’m more specifically talking about patients who self-medicate and will present with perhaps up to five or more prescription medications and then 15 or more dietary supplements, home remedies etc. I am not exaggerating.

It is not at all unusual for patients to literally bring half filled shopping bags into the office full of bottles, tubes, and creams.

Now some of this is certainly a byproduct of the times we live in, with poor access to qualified healthcare professionals. The problem is, when we feel helpless, we tend to reach in numerous different directions instead of focusing on one at a time.

When we feel empowered, we make different choices. We have a focus, purpose, and direction. This is why we strongly recommended patients take a very hard look at everything they are doing, and why, on their journey back to health. This is also why investing in some confident professional guidance can go along way towards restoring your mental, physical, and emotional health.

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Moving from Helplessness to Empowerment is a post from: Neuropathy | Neuropathy Doctors | Neuropathy Treatment | Neuropathy Treatments | Neuropathy Physical Therapists